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TREASURE SEAS

Squid

Teuthoidea

Squid are cephalopods of the order Teuthida, which comprises around 300 species. Like all other cephalopods, squid have a distinct head, bilateral symmetry, a mantle, and arms. Squid, like cuttlefish, have eight arms arranged in pairs and two, usually longer, tentacles. Squid are strong swimmers and certain species can 'fly' for short distances out of the water. The majority squid are no more than 60 centimeters long, although the giant squid may reach 13 metres.

Many species are popular as food in cuisines as diverse as Chinese, Greek, Turkish, Japanese, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Korean, Vietnamese, and Filipino.

In English-speaking countries, squid as food is often marketed using the Italian word calamari. Squid are found abundantly in certain areas, and provide large catches for fisheries. The body can be stuffed whole, cut into flat pieces or sliced into rings. The arms, tentacles and ink are also edible; in fact, the only parts that are not eaten are the beak and gladius (pen). Squid is a good food source for zinc, manganese and high in the recommended daily intake of copper, selenium, vitamin B12, and riboflavin.